Interactions between humans and machines are likely to increase dramatically in the future through voice and gesture controls, autonomous driving and technical implants. This exhibition by the Dresden Hygiene Museum investigates how digital, self-learning technologies can shape the relationships between people and their bodies and even alter the bodies themselves. How will our image of humanity be influenced if we become ever-closer linked – both cognitively and physically – with computers? How does artificial intelligence (AI) affect our daily lives and our living environment? The exhibition examines this thematic complex by means of objects, interactive knowledge modules and numerous works by international artists. The first part of the exhibition examines how movement sequences of daily life and in the work world are changing due to digital technologies. The second part illustrates how digital media – in particular those driven by AI – affect the human body and vice versa. The third part, entitled “Technobodies”, highlights the repercussions of digital classification and augmentation of biological bodies. This part focuses on the political and legal dimensions of digital access to the body and issues concerning privacy, security and the controllability of algorithms. Using numerous interactive modules, the curators shed light on the options and creative freedom that civil society and individual users have in the face of government authority and corporate interests. The exhibition includes a walk-through glossary in which terms such as clickwork, algorithm and neural networks are playfully described. The theme will also serve as an opportunity for the Hygiene Museum to reflect on itself and explore how digital transformation is changing its traditional focus on physical, material things.

Artistic director: N.N.
Artists: Nora Al-Badri and Nikolai Nelles, Anil Bawa-Cavia, Hella Gerlach, Adam Harvey and others

Date and Venues:

Exhibition, Hygiene-Museum Dresden: Sept. 2021 - Aug 2022

Con­tact

Deutsches Hygiene-Museum

Lingnerplatz 1
01069 Dresden

www.dhmd.de